Video: Transylvanians add voices to ‘Not My President’ protest

In an unprecedented show of resistance after an unprecedented presidential election cycle, protests against the election of Donald J. Trump have erupted in cities and on college campuses across the country. One such protest, a “Not My President” rally held outside the Lexington Courthouse at 6 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 12, attracted members of the Lexington community and the Transy community alike.

dsc_1322
Speakers and demonstrators gather on the courthouse plaza after marching the block around Limestone-Broadway.

Transy students, faculty and staff appeared among the crowd. Reasons for attending ranged from moral obligation to political advocacy.

“I’m here to raise awareness of not how to stop the election from happening, but how to beat the next president,” said first-year T. J. Roberts as he handed out pamphlets about America’s incarceration rate from the libertarian organization Students for Liberty.

Transy juniors Paola Garcia and Kacy Hines march with demonstrators down Short St.
Transy juniors Paola Garcia and Kacy Hines march with demonstrators down Short St.

“This has been an election built on hate, racism, misogyny, and xenophobia, and that’s not what I want this country to be about,” said senior Franklin Watson. “I’m here because morally, that just feels like the most right thing to do.”

The work of Transy professors Kurt Gohde and Kremena Todorova made an appearance, as well: “Unlearn Fear + Hate” appeared on several signs, even from members of the Lexington community.

The art-project-turned-social-movement begun by Transy professors Kremena Todorova and Kurt Gohde made several appearances at the protest.
The art-project-turned-social-movement begun by Transy professors Kremena Todorova and Kurt Gohde made several appearances at the protest.
dsc_1325
Transy juniors Joseph Bahena and Blake Taylor display an “Unlearn Fear + Hate” sign.

Transy’s Americorps Vista for Sustainability, Jennifer Lancaster, had personal reasons for attending.

“I was devastated to find out that Trump won the presidency,” said Lancaster. “As someone who identifies with the LGBT community, I feel threatened that some of my rights may be taken away. So, I’m here in solidarity.”

dsc_1297
A woman stands in support of the protesters on the balcony of Sidebar Grill, across the street from the courthouse plaza.

View the video above to see the protest in action

dsc_1319
Police stand in the third-story windows of the courthouse, overlooking the protest.
Local news organizations interviewing a handful of counter-protesters across the plaza. Shouting "We support Trump," a few verbal altercations passed between the opposing groups.
Local news organizations interviewing a handful of counter-protesters across the plaza. Shouting “We support Trump,” a few verbal altercations passed between the opposing groups.

The demonstration¬†was not without reverberation. Across the plaza, about three or four counter-protesters displayed Trump-Pence signs, shouting, “We support Trump.” A man with a “Make America Great Again” cap walked among the crowd passing out pamphlets, a large rifle slung over one shoulder.

But the protest, while loud, assertive and charged, remained without violence.

“I think it’s important that we have our voices heard as well, just because there have been so many voices yelling at each other, that we unite and all decide what we think we need to do under a country that’s totally divided right now,” said one Transy sophomore attending the protest.

dsc_1315
A man in the protest crowd holds up his fist.

We recognize that there are diverse perspectives in our campus community that are not all reflected by those who attended the protest. The Rambler invites and welcomes all healthy discourse and input.

SHARE
Previous articleLetter to the Editor defends artistic choices in ‘Anon(ymous)’
Next articleSGA Weekly Update: Nov. 9
Megan Graft
Editor-in-Chief - Born and raised in NKY. I love to be outdoors, be active, and travel, especially around the western U.S. I'm on The Rambler staff because I love to tell stories, and because I believe the student voice is crucial for Transy to thrive. Come find me at Common Grounds anytime.